Books

Recommended Reading


I Dont Want To Talk About It

I Don’t Want to Tak About It by Terrence Real

Each year, millions of men and women fall prey to depression. While the disorder has been called “psychiatry’s most treatable condition,” less than one in five get help. In recent years, the silence surrounding depression in women has begun to lift, but only now, with this powerful groundbreaking work, does psychotherapist Terrence Real expose a virtual epidemic of the disorder in men.

Twenty years of experience treating men and their families has convinced Terrence Real that there are two forms of depression: “overt” and “covert.” Feeling the stigma of depression’s unmanliness,” many men hide their condition not only from family and friends but even from themselves. Attempts to escape depression fuel many of the problems we think of as typically male — difficulty with intimacy, workaholism, alcoholism, abusive behavior, and rage. By directing their pain outward, depressed men hurt the people they love, and, most tragically, pass their condition on to their children.

 

 

 
shoot-the-damn-dog

Shoot the Damn Dog: A Memoir of Depression by Sally Brampton

A searing, raw memoir of depression that is ultimately uplifting and inspiring.

A successful magazine editor and prize-winning journalist, Sally Brampton launched Elle magazine in the UK in 1985. But behind the successful, glamorous career was a story that many of her friends and colleagues knew nothing about—her ongoing struggle with severe depression and alcoholism. Brampton’s is a candid, tremendously honest telling of how she was finally able to “address the elephant in the room,” and of a culture that sends the overriding message that people who suffer from depression are somehow responsible for their own illness. She offers readers a unique perspective of depression from the inside that is at times wrenching, but ultimately inspirational, as it charts her own coming back to life. Beyond her personal story, Brampton offers practical advice to all those affected by this illness. This book will resonate with any person whose life has been haunted by depression, at the same time offering help and understanding to those whose loved ones suffer from this debilitating condition.

 

 

NoondayDemonThe Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression

The Noonday Demon examines depression in personal, cultural, and scientific terms. Drawing on his own struggles with the illness and interviews with fellow sufferers, doctors and scientists, policy makers and politicians, drug designers and philosophers, Andrew Solomon reveals the subtle complexities and sheer agony of the disease. He confronts the challenge of defining the illness and describes the vast range of available medications, the efficacy of alternative treatments, and the impact the malady has on various demographic populations — around the world and throughout history. He also explores the thorny patch of moral and ethical questions posed by emerging biological explanations for mental illness. With uncommon humanity, candor, wit, and erudition, award-winning author Solomon takes readers on a journey of incom-parable range and resonance into the most pervasive of family secrets. His contribution to our understanding not only of mental illness but also of the human condition is truly stunning.

 

 

 

boy-in-the-ivyBoy in the Ivy: The Inner Child of a Buried Man

In 2009, T McKinley’s brother committed suicide, and his first question to himself was why he hadn’t done the same. In this moving and poignant memoir, McKinley takes the reader back through the events that led to a lifelong struggle with depression, shame, and inadequacy. Beginning with his own conception and birth and continuing through his parents’ divorce and the fragmentation of his family, McKinley traces the origins and evolution of his deep-seated belief that everyone would have been better off if he had never existed at all. In this way, McKinley blamed, rejected, and buried his inner child, setting himself up for a lifetime of disconnection and depression.

Years later, McKinley married, had two children, and soon saw that he was repeating the same toxic patterns that defined his own childhood. His feelings of hopelessness continued to increase until the family bought a fixer-upper house in suburban Virginia. As they sifted through the rubble of the dysfunctional family that had come before, McKinley was brought face-to-face with the pain that had buried him for far too long. He began to realize his own value to his family and reconnect with his own childhood—and the innocent child he had once been—in a more compassionate and loving way. He realized he was not broken, but that he did need to ask for help. Ultimately, through this experience, McKinley was able to find the hope that his brother never could.

 

 

The Shame Of Me CoverThe Shame of Me, One Man’s Journey to Depression and Back

Kansas City Royals’ broadcaster Ryan Lefebvre seems to have it all – a dream sports job of announcing Major League Baseball, a huge house on a lake, plenty of expensive toys, good looks, and the admiration of friends and fans. But depression is seldom deterred by such superficial trappings. And depression’s grip on Ryan was so strong and so unyielding that he nearly ended his life.

In one moment, he’s a glib play-by-play announcer…the next, he’s a tormented soul on the floor of his closet. And that’s just the beginning of The Shame of Me, the spell-binding story of Ryan’s descent into the darkness of depression, his courageous struggle to recover, and his new perspectives on living a balanced and healthy life.

Told with intimacy and immediacy, Ryan’s story is a must-read for anyone who has ever struggled with inner doubts. It is especially powerful for men who may be feeling lost, but are too embarrassed to confront their problems. Ryan, the son of former Major League player and manager Jim Lefebvre, and co-author Jefferey Flanagan take us through living hell before Ryan’s recovery and redemption give us hope for anyone who suff ers from the debilitating disease Major Depressive Disorder.

 

 

 

compassofpleasureThe Compass of Pleasure: How Our Brains Make Fatty Foods, Orgasm, Exercise, Marijuana, Generosity, Vodka, Learning, and Gambling Feel So Good

As he did in his award-winning book The Accidental Mind, David J. Linden—highly regarded neuroscientist, professor, and writer—weaves empirical science with entertaining anecdotes to explain how the gamut of behaviors that give us a buzz actually operates. The Compass of Pleasure makes clear why drugs like nicotine and heroin are addictive while LSD is not, how fast food restaurants ensure that diners will eat more, why some people cannot resist the appeal of a new sexual encounter, and much more. Provocative and illuminating, this is a radically new and thorough look at the desires that define us.